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  • in reply to: Android the Board Game #14251
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    Hi Unihead,

    This very much has me discouraged that you feel like you wasted your time! I’m sorry that the experience was not what you or the players were hoping for. Why didn’t you stop after the first half of the game when nobody was having fun? I can only take the blame for convincing you to try it, so please don’t hold it against me!

    I can’t speak for a 4 player game, but my 3 player games have been enjoyable for me and my friends. I’m glad you at least gave it a real try. I was hoping you’d try what I did before my first multi-player game: a trial run as a solo experience. It gave me a better feel for everything before bringing in a big party in. If I hadn’t done that first, I may have been frustrated and overwhelmed and not understanding the bigger picture. Also with my solo play, I left it on the table and played in small bite-sized sessions over several days. This kept me from getting too overwhelmed and I was able to better absorb all the details. Having that deeper level of knowledge about the game world made things much easier when other players joined me for a real game. I could then treat my role as more of a host or a GM in an RPG. It allowed me to make sure the story and everything else made cohesive sense. When the players finally joined me, we only played the first half of the game and completed the second half of the game in our next game session (7 days later). My group really enjoys playing RPG’s and games that tell immersive and descriptive stories, so maybe all those factors are what made a difference for us.

    Seems like this game has a very hard division line. You either like it or your don’t, there is no in-between. It’s been said in many forums that this game is not for everyone, so all players must understand what they are getting into before investing the time. It might also depend on what kind of games you enjoy. Some folks like tactical combat, dice rolling games. Others like abstract strategy, Euro-style victory point driven games. I’m a well-rounded gamer in all of those categories, but others are strict dice rolling brawlers and won’t touch a game like this. Game experiences usually depend on the group you are playing with, which means if one person is not enjoying the game it can affect everyone at the table. Also if everyone at the table is overwhelmed or confused and not understanding complexities, then it’s definitely going to be a bad experience.

    Again accept my apologies for your sub-par experience with this game.
    Thanks for sharing your thoughts about it.

    in reply to: Android the Board Game #14224
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    UniHead,

    Looking forward to hearing about how this goes after you bring it to the table to play as a group. Make sure to frame the backstory and the premise the way I suggested in my original post (2 years ago). I’m willing to bet everyone will have a much better time with the game if expectations are set correctly from the start. This is doubly important because of the longer play time. You want everyone to understand what they are in for. Remember – everyone is acting as an unseen force of storytelling, they are helping to write the script to a world-spanning epic movie from the point of view of the character they have chosen to create a plot for. Enjoy!!

    in reply to: Universal Head's Game Collection? #14173
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    HA! For some strange reason I’ve only been getting notifications for the battle report videos, but never saw the unpacking videos! Congrats on getting a house and finally reclaiming your game collection.
    Watching the unpacking videos now!

    in reply to: Android the Board Game #14167
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    UniHead,

    Here’s another great discussion we had 2 1/2 years ago!

    Since I presume you finally have access to your copy of Android the Board Bame, it’s time to bring it out to the light of day. If you have some extra leisure time, I suggest trying a solo playthrough just to experience the rich plots of each character’s story. In my first post above, I mentioned that for a solo game you can use the minimum of 3 characters and only play dark cards against the character to the left of the active character. Everything else can be played as normal.

    One other thing I’d like to mention since all this time has passed. I remember when Android: Netrunner was released, the only source or lore and backstory of the Android Universe at that time was the rulebook from Android the Board Game. So it’s also fun just to read through the rulebook and see the origin stories of this rich universe.

    Not sure if you have seen this, but FFG has recently released a hardcover tome that is the definitive guide to the Android universe complete with the backstories of key characters, the corporations, and all the accompanying artwork.
    It’s called “The Worlds of Android”: http://a.co/biJpWXK

    in reply to: Universal Head's Game Collection? #14166
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    Hi UniHead!

    So I was revisiting some past discussions on the EoG forums and found this one from 2 1/2 years ago!
    From what I understand, you have finally been reunited with your entire game collection? Is that correct?
    If so, I look forward to any videos you can make that shows off your collection!

    in reply to: A Star Wars Descent! #8600
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    WOW! UniHead, that is such terrific news! I must say, Mark is an incredible fellow gamer to so quickly be willing to share his content on the EOG. I think a great many of us owe you our gratitude for all the incredible game summaries and tutorials you have given us so far. He seems to share that sentiment and his videos will be a great addition to the already stellar content.

    Sorastro(Mark), if you are out there, thanks for your contribution to the gaming community!

    in reply to: A Star Wars Descent! #8559
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    That is quite a large number of subscribers, but that makes it all the more clear that Imperial Assault is a big deal. It gives the impression that there are tons of gamers out there who are interested in painting the minis for IA.

    You should definitely try to contact him and see if he would be interested in posting his tutorials as a guest contributor for EOG. I could help to fill out the content for IA on the EOG site

    in reply to: A Star Wars Descent! #8557
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    UniHead, you must not miss out on this game. Don’t hesitate! What you get is well worth the price of admission!
    I know you said you aren’t too interested, but you can’t miss out on this fun!

    I have played it several times already and I don’t think it feels much like Descent at all. As you know I have Descent 2.0 and they may share similar component structures, but the story and the atmosphere stands all on it’s own. Especially if you are a fan of the original trilogy (forget that prequel nonsense).The mechanics, the rule books, the components are leaps better than what we find in Descent. Don’t get me wrong, I still like Descent, but this one is a must have even for you.

    The minis in this game are a far superior, durable plastic. Nothing like that soft bendy plastic that we find with Descent minis. This should make the painting experience sheer joy for you. Btw, I am eagerly awaiting your painting tutorial for this one, but you must get started soon because this newcomer to YouTube has got a jump on you and he does some very high quality video work. Maybe invite him to be a contributor to EOG as well?

    Star Wars Painting Guide Ep.1

    in reply to: Android the Board Game #7824
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    I have downloaded and briefly looked at the “Director’s Cut” version. Let’s be clear for any future readers of this post. The “Director’s Cut” is an alternate home-brewed rules document made by a gamer who was dissatisfied with the rules that came with the game. I’m willing to bet he didn’t change his mindset about how to approach the game as I have already suggested. The document can be found on BoardGameGeek under the files section of the Android game listing.

    So for me, based on how I described the spirit of the game and the game designer’s original intentions, the “Director’s Cut” shifts everything out of the focus that I have described in my previous post. I just don’t think it would be the same game if you try to force yourself to take on the role of the character and place evidence like you would do when finding a clue in Mansions of Madness. The game just wasn’t designed to work that way. For some people, they might really like it if they aren’t able to wrap their head around being a “screenwriter”. For me I probably wont ever play the game that way because I have been enlightened and come to fully realize what the game was designed to be (see the above post). 🙂

    However, I too would be interested to see what others thought after playing these alternate rules. I would want to hear how they think it compares after playing a normal rules game using the mindset I suggest.

    Unihead, as far as you having all your best games in storage (including Android), I think you really need to do something about that! Ask an old friend or relative to ship you over a crate of your games!! Also, I agree with you. FFG should have made things more clear in the rule book and marketing of the game. They should have explained that you are are taking on the role of a storytelling force. But since they didn’t, everyone got confused and gave up on the game, leaving an incredible gem of a game on the shelf!

    in reply to: Android the Board Game #7821
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    I have to say that Android (the board game) is one of the most thematic, immersive and incredible board games ever created. I think the mechanics and game play are ingenious and it’s one of the most under-appreciated games out there. I don’t think I will ever trade or sell my copy because it has such impressive components and captivating characters and story lines. Even the rulebook is beautiful!

    Most folks don’t understand that 95% of the enjoyment of the game requires reading a large amount of text in order to get involved in the story enough to care about the characters and what happens to them. Lots of people don’t have patience for that. In this game, it requires you to follow the current plot of your own character as well as the plots of the other characters being played. Since it’s a different game every time (with different plot trees), that’s an important thing to understand. If it’s a player’s first time with the game, this can be quite overwhelming. That’s why I think it’s best to introduce new players to the game by only playing through one “week” per game session. Maybe split it up and play the second “week” during a different game session or after a nice lunch break.

    More importantly, before the game starts, every player needs to spend the time reading their character’s back story and all the plot cards (with all the outcomes). Maybe even skimming through their light cards to see what things they can aim for. Remind them that plots are color coded and light/dark cards will match the colors of the plots. It might also help if the owner of the game has thoroughly read the back story of the Android universe in the rule book (including the small areas of fluff text), and shared the theme and backdrop with everyone in order to set the stage. Players can then go around the table summarize their character’s back story for the rest of the group (just like you would do at the start of an RPG campaign). This should give new players a good solid starting point.

    I have actually enjoyed playing the game solo (with 3 characters), even using the normal rules. This helps you get to know the characters really well and it’s similar to a choose your own adventure story. When playing solo, I only draw and play dark cards on the character to the left of the active character. Since all evidence is turned face down, you still won’t know which character had the correct hunch until the end of the solo game! But remember, it’s possible for players to still win the game even if their hunch proves wrong!

    One big comment I have to make regarding the “framing” of a suspect instead of proving them guilty. You have to understand that this game experience is built around players being an omnipotent storytelling “creator”. You are not actually playing the character, you are more like some unseen force of fate or destiny that causes the character to go down a certain path (their plot), and at the same time you are affecting the fate of all the other characters in the game. Think about it. Could Raymond Flint (the character, not the player) actually have any way of causing Floyd to experience a bad event (via a dark card)? This would be impossible, especially if it has to do with Floyd’s plot that Raymond knows nothing about. That’s why you have to constantly remind yourself that you are not playing a character, you are only influencing what happens to him or her in the overall story.

    You are basically a co-screenwriter of a sprawling epic movie. And with that omnipotent power of insight about all characters in the story, you are making plot decisions organically in real-time. Looking at it in this way you can also easily see that the evidence discovery and placement can be abstracted. The game doesn’t describe what the evidence was or how it is connected to a suspect. You can assume that all those tedious details have been figured out by the character. All you are doing is playing the role of “fate” trying to match up the evidence to the characters hunch. So I see it as a storytelling responsibility and not a “frame” job.

    I’m sure alot of people will not agree with me on this, but I believe that is the spirit of what the game designer was trying to achieve. Most gamers like to take on the role of the character they are playing, but that just doesn’t work in this game. You have to approach it with a completely different mindset. And once you do, a whole new world of possibilities and awesomeness of this Android universe come pouring out. If you can just shift your mindset a bit, and show the other players the how to do the same, the entire group will truly enjoy this game and become fully immersed and invested.

    in reply to: Brushes for mini painting #7797
    AvatarShadowClipse
    Participant

    Excellent! Thanks UniHead!
    I too was seriously considering getting a wet palette. Now that you so strongly recommend it, I have now added it to my shopping list for painting supplies!

    Thanks for that link from coolmini, it’s helpful getting some comparisons!
    Just as a side note, I’m trying to get all my proper supplies lined up so I can paint both my Descent 2nd Edition minis as well as the core box of Mansions of Madness. So that being said I really appreciate your reference photos and painting tutorials!

    What are you currently painting (using the wet palette)?
    I’m hoping to to see you eventually paint the minis from Imperial Assault after it releases at the end of the year 🙂

    Cheers!!

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)