The Joy of Unboxing: Deadzone

I dunno what the hell’s in there, but it’s weird and pissed off, whatever it is.

It’s time to go back to the future with Deadzone, Mantic’s take on big-box squad-level miniatures combat.

Mantic Games, sometimes called the poor man’s Games Workshop but probably more aptly titled the person-with-a-normal-income’s Games Workshop, continue to pillage their inspiration’s back catalogue with this thinly disguised take on Necromunda. That all sounds critical, but it’s not! Games Workshop needs a reasonably-priced competitor, and Necromunda is one of my favourite games, criminally ignored for years by GW—so I’m a proud owner of Deadzone and well done Mantic for making it.

There’s nothing original in the way of theme here—it’s The Thing meets Warhammer 40K—but never mind, it’s just an excuse for some good old-fashioned squad-level biffo with some nice terrain and models. Necromunda, despite being released in 1995 (or perhaps because of being released in 1995, considering production costs these days) still holds the crown for the best urban terrain in a game, but this modular plastic cube system is serviceable, and the mousemat-material play mat is excellent.

I’m looking forward to getting this on the table, but I have a crapload of construction, modelling and painting to do first. It’s not a job for beginners, so I’ll be making a series of videos on the preparation, construction and painting of the Deadzone components. And of course they’ll be the usual rules summary and reference (I’ve added the game to the library but the rules summary is still a work in progress—patience my little ones, patience …).

Now, to wet your whistle and get started, join me as I open the box for the first time and check out the pile of plastic and assorted goodies that go to make up a box full of Deadzone.

Come along with me on a journey… a journey that will end in urban combat!

What do you think?